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Dressing Ship


International Code of Signal Flags
For national holidays, at regattas, and on other special occasions, yachts often dress ship with International Code of Signal Flags. The ship is dressed at 0800, and remains so dressed until evening colors (while at anchor only, except for a vessel's maiden and final voyages, and participation in a marine parade or other unique situation)

For national holidays, at regattas, and on other special occasions, yachts often dress ship with International Code of Signal Flags. The ship is dressed at 0800, and remains so dressed until evening colors (while at anchor only, except for a vessel's maiden and final voyages, and participation in a marine parade or other unique situation)
In dressing ship, the national ensign is hoisted at the stern staff (and the Union Jack may be displayed at the jack (bow) staff on government vessels). A rainbow of flags of the International Code is arranged, reaching from the water line forward to the water line aft, by way of the bowsprit end (or stem if there's no bowsprit) and the masthead(s). Flags and pennants are bent on alternately, rather than in any indiscriminate manner. Since there are twice as many letter flags as numeral pennants, it is good practice, as in the Navy, to follow a sequence of two flags, one pennant, two flags, one pennant, throughout. The sequence recommended here provides a harmonious color pattern throughout:

Starting from forward: AB2, UJ1, KE3, GH6, IV5, FL4, DM7, PO Third Repeater, RN First Repeater, ST Zero, CX9, WQ8, ZY Second Repeater. - Chapman Boating Etiquette

We supply sets of useful code flags (an age-old maritime communication method) as well as individual flags (all our U.S. flags are sewn stripes and embroidered stars), such as the yellow quarantine flag to announce your arrival in port and notify customs and immigration officials that you are ready for processing.

Our Code Set flags feature double stitched seams with nylon rope and ash toggles. It contains 26 alphabet flags, 11 pennants, and 3 substitute flags as well as a handy nylon storage bag.

Code signals should be approximately 1/2 inch on the 'fly' [horizontal side] for each foot above the waterline of the tallest mast on the boat. (That is, if the top of the mast is 30 feet above the waterline, these flags should be 15 inches on the 'fly', which would be our #NFCS0 Size Zero Set.)